47: Connecting the Breath with the Inner Mental Attitude

how to meditate

A connection with the inner mental attitude is made, and then sustained, with this guided meditation that makes a sense of the inner mental attitude vivid and clear, and then helps you to maintain and sustain it. This is a great way to remain present, close and intimate with your home in this body and mind, and to extend your stay so that it becomes very clear to you what it is.

I sure hope this has been helpful to you in your exploration of meditation.

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Alan

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  • Andrea Robinson

    I really liked the concept of this one, and especially appreciated when you pointed out that our faces may automatically find a subtle smiling position, which was certainly true for me. I doubt if anyone looking at me would see the smile, but I felt the smile muscles nevertheless. I had difficulty connecting an internal feeling of smiling within my body, however, and decided not to force it. Actually, the feeling inside my body was defensive because of something that’s been bothering me lately. When you said to open to feeling receptive, I had an insight that you can’t be receptive and defensive at the same time.

    This is my year of peace; I’ve been working on finding that emotion all this year. Like a lot of people, I’ve bounced between extreme emotions for all of my life, and I’m just now learning to find peace in life no matter what’s happening. I can do “nothing” as long as I’m doing something like playing a game or watching TV, but meditation teaches us to do “nothing” while finding peace. I think that’s an incredibly valuable skill, since often there’s nothing to be done about whatever we’re facing, and learning to find peace in the midst of whatever’s going on, whether joyful or sad, will keep us in balance.

    Anyway, I appreciated this subject very much, and I’ve come to think that meditation is not “doing nothing,” but doing something – breathing, appreciating being alive, and finding peace.

    :)